Kindle Popular Highlights

I’ll be doing a little reading up here in Vermont and I was going through the Kindle edition of my book to figure out what to read and stumbled on the Popular Highlights feature.

Because I’m up here doing the truly daunting task of trying to finish a second novel, I thought I’d share some of those highlights from The Solomons. More to shore myself up than anything else. It was fun to look back on some of these lines. Many of them I remember of course, but one or two, I don’t. In fact, if I had not found them in my OWN BOOK I wouldn’t have believed I’d written them. Funny how that happens.

In this book I was obsessed with the idea of wanting and desire. Not even sexual desire although that was certainly a part of it, but also, wanting. Wanting things, wanting a new place to live, wanting to be someone else. My old professor and friend wrote this down for me long ago: Desire always exceeds the object. (Lacan)

You want something in you killed but you don’t want killing it to kill you, yet you’re willing to kill yourself in order to kill it if that’s what it takes. Is that right?

They are shipwrecked on the coast of the Israeli left.

Is there something Shira could buy that would eradicated all the wanting? That is the thing she wants most of all, whatever it is.

At your age you never think you’ll get old. You never think you’ll die. You think you’ll be prepared when you final do. You’ll be done with being young, but you never are. It’s not that I want to be immortal. I just want to go back to that time before I knew I would die. You know?

You want something in you killed but you don’t want killing it to kill you, yet you’re willing to kill yourself in order to kill it if that’s what it takes. Is that right?

That morning he will understand that the substance of ambition is only ever a shadow of what we thought we wanted.

Marc has a theory that no one loves anyone after a certain age. We are, none of us, really capable of it. Right about the time you stop discovering new music, that’s the moment you are incapable of love. Everything beyond that moment is as mechanical as a wind-up toy. It is all memory and ghosts. And yet.

The bottomless wanting is what will ruin her in the end because bottomless wanting is like falling through a well. Everything one desires is a tenuous little shelf that only briefly breaks the fall.

Yom asal, yom basal, Marc thought. He’d thought this often recently. One day honey, the next day onions. It was an Arabic expression he’d heard from his father as a child, or perhaps it had been imprinted in his DNA, long ago, before he was born.